How You Use Social Media Can Kill Your Business

The social media movement has expanded the amount of people we can reach and connect with on a personal level. The new relationships and connections we create with people all over the world can have a profound effect on our personal and business growth. We learn about cultures and nations that we were, perhaps, previously ignorant of. None of this is a new concept, but what may be is how quickly you can destroy your business by using social media incorrectly.

TRANSPARENCY IS A UTOPIAN CONCEPT

Not too long ago, Michael Fortin wrote an article titled “Don’t Be Transparent, Be Authentic Instead”. That article is an important read for any social media wrangling business blogger and you can search for it online.

That article is the tip of the iceberg in the concept of ‘transparency’ being too Utopian to work within the jaded confines of our society. Of course, true transparency is ideal. Many things about a perfect world are. Unfortunately, as a group, most of the world isn’t ready or willing to accept true transparency without penalty.

WHEN TRANSPARENCY FAILS

Let me give you a couple of examples of transparency failure we’ve seen.

Failure 1: We had a copywriter who was posting on Twitter about the work he was doing. He made several posts within a few hour period which were ugly complaints about a client and how ‘stupid’ he felt that client was. We obviously considered this unacceptable and immediately removed him from our list of subcontractors, but think about this: If he was hoping to use Twitter to get more client work – how many potential clients just read that and thought… “I’m not going to risk being badmouthed on here, I’ll find someone else.” Everyone gets frustrated, but what if the client he was working on read that? Put it this way, if you wouldn’t say it to your client directly – don’t post it either.

Failure 2: We had a designer who was a day late returning her design phase work. When we contacted her, she said she had a family emergency the night before and was unable to send in her work because she wasn’t home. A quick check on her Facebook showed that she was actually out at a party that night and posted multiple times while drunk talking about how much she was drinking and even hinting at wanting to bring a man she met there home with her. Obviously, we relieved her of the design work, handed it to another designer who caught up on the time schedule, and never again worked with her. In this case, people are allowed to have a life, we understand that. But if you cannot get your work done and have to lie about why – it’s a problem. If you do not have enough class to not post details about your ‘wild nights’ to everyone on your social networks — that’s also a problem.

HOW WE MONITOR SOCIAL MEDIA CONVERSATIONS

My business has been around for over a decade and is very focused on client satisfaction and excellent treatment of our web design clients. We have a network of hundreds of copywriters, designers, and coders who work with us on projects. However, even with screening of those experts when they come on board with us – you don’t always know someone until you have observed them over a long period of time.

That’s why we monitor what they say online.

How do we do that? Well first we get as many of their social profiles as we can. Usually, we ask for a list of them. We’ve also found that most people won’t provide them all. We then Google search the usernames of the ones they have given us because most people use the same usernames over and over. We also monitor blogs, and check for listings of social networks on those.

We have a system set up to consolidate all their social media comments into one master feed. That master feed can then be browsed directly to see what they’re up to, but that’s a lot of things to read each day. What we do is take the master feed, run it through a filter that creates two sub-feeds based on certain things we think are important to monitor. The first sub-feed is created by running the master list through a keyword & synonym filter that pulls out words related to business – for instance, “client” “business” “work” etc… The second sub-feed has a filter that runs their posts through a check for foul language and words like “sex” “drugs” “drunk” etc… There are hundreds of words in each filter.

Seem a bit ‘big brother’? It probably is – but reputation and client treatment is very important to us.

Here’s the thing: If we can read it and you can lose work with us over it… how many POTENTIAL clients did you lose also?

7 WAYS TO EDIT YOURSELF

We’re not suggesting you stop having a life and stop making mistakes. You can post about those things and it simply makes you a more interesting person to read about. Just use common sense:

1. If you wouldn’t say it to a client or boss – don’t say it where they can read it either.

2. If you wouldn’t say it to your grandmother – don’t say it on your public posts.

3. If you wouldn’t say it to police officer – don’t post it on your social networks. For that matter, don’t do it either.

4. If you plan to lie to your boss – don’t put the truth where they can see it.

5. If you plan to go out and get drunk and know you have a tendency to post while drunk – give your phone to a friend to keep for you.

6. Learn how to use privacy settings and understand how visible your posts are on different social networks.

7. If you want a place to vent – create a completely different identity for yourself to do that. Name no names in your posts, and make no connection to your other profiles or email addresses.

Consider it all part of Internet Etiquette. Social networks are great to hear more personal things about someone and we encourage people to share a bit of themselves online (using normal cautions etc..). In the long run, full transparency is too Utopian for our modern world to handle well. We’re still at a point in our societal growth that when someone seriously calls a client an idiot – they tend to get a bit upset about it.

Holiday Home Property Management – How to Make the Most of the Internet

Everyone knows that the Internet is transforming business in general but far fewer people know how to turn it to advantage for their own business.

In holiday home property management, the internet is changing the rules in all kinds of ways. Firstly, most people who are looking to find a holiday home look online first to research their options and get an idea of what kind of holiday homes are available and at what price, in their selected destination.

In fact, many businesses and even tourist boards no longer worry about printing expensive glossy brochures anymore – the action is all online these days!

UK industry research indicates that the internet is by far the largest single source of information when people are looking for holiday homes. So there is no question that your web presence is increasingly the most important element of your marketing.

Whether you decide to have your own website or you just have a page or two on a third party site, it is vital to really focus on making sure your holiday home is presented in the best possible light. Always invest in the best photography you can afford. You should also consider adding additional features such as using video to make your holiday home stand out from the competition.

However, if only it were as simple as making sure the holiday home looks great on your website! In fact, internet marketing raises a whole host of other challenges It is all very well to have a great looking site, but what if nobody ever comes across it because it languishes somewhere on the 100th page of the search engine results when someone does a search on ‘holiday homes’ in a particular area? It is a sobering fact that 80% of people do not ever look beyond even the first page of search results.

So there has sprung up a whole new industry of search engine optimisation experts to help you rank at a high position on Google and the rest of the search engines. If it is simply not realistic to improve your ranking significantly in the ‘organic’ results, you can always consider a ‘pay per click’ campaign, where you effectively bid for the chance to appear in the sponsored links on the right hand side of the search results page. This is a practical and easily managed way of improving your visibility to your target group for a fixed budget.

It is also vital to offer online booking if at all possible. There are a huge number of options when it comes to software to allow you to provide this facility to prospective customers. With online bookings now accounting for roughly 20% of all holiday bookings in the UK and growing fast – it would be short sighted not to offer an online booking facility on your website. There are a whole range of IT solutions available to you at every price range, so you should take time to do some thorough research.

Another area that can provide rich returns is email marketing. Aim to build up a list of email addresses of previous customers and other people who may be interested in your holiday homes so that you can send them regular email newsletters in future, to keep your holiday homes top of mind and increase the chances of repeat bookings.

You can also save money and streamline the efficiency of your property management by using email to let guests know in advance about any holiday concierge services available to them, as well as the key holder services and cleaning services they can expect during their stay. This will increase customer satisfaction with your service and can also provide the opportunity for secondary sales.

The bottom line is that promoting your holiday home well on the Internet will certainly increase the return on your investment. You may not personally have the IT skills or knowledge of web marketing and search engine optimisation to be able to fulfil all the potential yourself. So do not be afraid to turn to experts for advice or assistance. You will find that some of the better holiday home property management companies can also provide guidance and practical assistance.

Or you could choose to make the time and effort to teach yourself what you need to know using the many excellent free resources available on the Internet.

Whichever route you take, it is vital to recognise that making full use of the Internet is no longer an optional extra – it should be the core strategy for anyone who is serious about property management and achieving a high yield on their investment.

Learning Medical Business Office Management

Medical business office managers are in-charge of overseeing a healthcare facility’s office personnel and tasks that are administrative in nature. They may also manage a whole facility or specialize in managing a definite clinical area or department, or run a medical practice for a set of physicians.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), “employment of medical and health services managers is projected to grow 23 percent from 2012 to 2022, much faster than the average for all occupations. As the large baby-boom population ages and people remain active later in life, the healthcare industry as a whole will see an increase in the demand for medical services.” The employment change is expected to generate 73,300 jobs until 2022.

If you want to work with medical office matters, education is the key. To learn medical business office management most employers require medical business office managers whom have completed online training programs or have associates or bachelor’s degrees. Educational requirements vary by employer.

Students in medical business office management may have classes in records management, computer software, typing and general administration. Courses in medical software programs, insurance and billing procedures, legalities in health care, ethics and medical vocabulary are also included. Additionally, handling human resources and marketing tasks are accounted for as well.

Those in four-year programs, courses may include human resource management, investment, economics, political affairs and strategic planning. They also study fundamental medical topics such as illnesses and disease prevention.

A person interested to become a medical business officer manager must have the following qualities:

Analytical skills. Understand and follow present regulations and be able to adjust to new laws.
Communication skills. To be able to communicate successfully with health professionals.
Detail oriented. Medical business office managers must be detail-oriented in order to be able to organize information, especially for large facilities.
Interpersonal skills. Be able to motivate and lead staff and discuss staffing and patient problems and information.
Problem-solving skills. Be able to stumble on resourceful solutions to staffing or other administrative problems.
Technical skills. Be able to follow developments in healthcare technology like coding and classification software or electronic health records.

Upon landing employment and gaining experience, some managers may choose to be certified. The Professional Association of Health Care Office Management offers certification in health information management or medical management. Moreover, the American College of Health Care Administrators presents the Certified Nursing Home Administrator and Certified Assisted Living Administrator distinctions to those interested.

According to BLS, nursing care facility administrators need to be licensed. “In most states, these administrators must have a bachelor’s degree, pass a licensing exam, and complete a state-approved training program. Some states also require administrators in assisted-living facilities to be licensed,” the BLS states.

Wages of medical and health services managers differ by the type and size of the facility and by rank of responsibility. In May 2012, the median annual wage for medical and health services managers was $88,580. The bottom 10 percent earned less than $53,940, and the top 10 percent earned more than $150,560.